Polski / English

Trupa Trupa are Grzegorz Kwiatkowski, Tomek Pawluczuk, Wojtek Juchniewicz and Rafał Wojczal. In 2015 the Band released „Headache" – a critically acclaimed album released on CD and cassette by the British label Blue Tapes and X-Ray Records (Jute Gyte, Tashi Dorji, Mats Gustafsson, Katie Gately). In 2016, "Headache Remastered" was re-released on vinyl and CD by the French label Ici d'ailleurs (Yann Tiersen, Matt Elliott/The Third Eye Foundation and Stefan Wesołowski). The band’s newest album "Jolly New Songs" will be released on the  27th of October as a result of an international collaboration of Ici d’ailleurs along with Blue Tapes and X-Ray Records.

PRESS

"Their 2015 release Headache has very strong song writing and seems to be carrying that strength over to singles we’ve heard from their upcoming record Jolly New Songs due out later this year. Definitely watch out for these guys.”

KEXP Radio

"To Me" by Trupa Trupa on BBC Radio 6 Music (Lauren Laverne, Tom Ravenscroft, Gideon Coe). Tom Ravenscroft described it as "Epic beyond words!".

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www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists

"One of my favorite bands out of Europe these days is Trupa Trupa out of Gdansk, Poland. Their excellent new album, Jolly New Songs, is due out in late October, but they just released their first single, "To Me", which sounds to me like The Beach Boys' Surfs Up crashing into MBV's Loveless. Give it a listen, won't you?"

Ron Hart, American music critic who has written for such publications as Billboard, Pitchfork, Rolling Stone, Observer, VICE and Paste Magazine among many others

"Entitled Jolly New Songs, the album sees the band gunning for an overtly more triumphant tone than previous offerings. You can check out the first taste of the record via the video above for lead track ‚To Me’, a warming, somewhat anthemic cut with an underbelly of darkness, summing up the Gdansk-based group’s new tack on Jolly New Songs."

Christian Eede, www.thequietus.com

"Something I really enjoy about music is challenging myself with what I listen to when I click play. This is complete deflated when I hear someone singing. I just find it more unique when things are lyric-less or plane sampled. Maybe it’s more of a sculpture that way than someone’s middle-school poetry they mid-life crisis’d into a hard rock trope that’s fucking northern European. However (and most importantly), I gave up “rock and roll” long ago in the old Tipp City Post Office basement with Brandon and Nick and Marshall years ago, though, if I were there now with them jamming, we’d totally pump out some tunes like Trupa Trupa’s “To Me.” Snoop the color-soaked video above and believe in a few more Jolly New Songs in October. More to come!"

C MONSTER, www.tinymixtapes.com

"While sometimes hearing rock and roll played from a non-English as first language country can be alarmingly bad or cartoonish, sometimes you hear the most interesting stuff imaginable. One of my favorite discoveries of the past year was digging into a Hungarian band from the ’70s called Illes – who were like the Beatles (or Stones) of Hungary, during the Communist era, and while reflecting the ’60s rock movement also retained elements of their native folk music and launguage. Now it’s 2017, and the world is global and information spreads more easily, so I don’t know that there’s a direct „Polish-ness” to Trupa Trupa, but there is an otherworld and unique vibe the exists in the songs – I’m not sure a band from the UK or US could sound like this. What’s it sounds like? If you take a bit of the Radiohead post-rock and a touch of Pink Floyd with a litte minimalism added in, plus whatever the second language and folk traditions their Polishness must impart, and you get this really interesting thing happening."

Jim McGuinn, program director at The Current

Headache among the best LPs of 2015 and TT as one of the best rock bands - says Sasha Frere-Jones, one of the world's most influential music critics writing for the LA Times: "One of the best rock bands doing business now is from Gdansk, Poland. The lead singer of Trupa Trupa is poet Grzegorz Kwiatkowski, who sings (and speaks, sometimes) in English. The band recalls a less woozy version of Dungen, another band who know their ’60s psychedelia but don’t sound like thirsty revivalists. Kwiatkowski leans into the conversational loopiness of Syd Barrett and the band flowers behind him. Beauty and intensity get equal space here.”
Sasha Frere-Jones, Los Angeles Times

"This is incredible work. The result is their first moment of true greatness.”
Tristan Bath, The Quietus
 
"It’s 2015, everyone, and did you hear? Bands are back in a big way, and Trupa Trupa is hands-down among the very best of them.”
Strauss, Tiny Mix Tapes